1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Dear Guest !! Welcome to the Indian Defence Wiki Forum, The go to forum for all things India related. Feel free to browse our forum or sign up to join our community.

Gadgets, Smartphone & Telecom News

Discussion in 'Members Lounge' started by Rock n Rolla, Jul 23, 2014.

  1. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Xiaomi Mi 3 review: Rebuilding the image of Chinese smartphones

    [​IMG]
    Xiaomi's flagship Mi3

    As we settle into the second half of the year, where Apple and Google reveal their next-gen flagships, the smartphone market should ideally cool down. But not in India, where it’s a bonanza of smartphones from LG, Asus and newcomer Xiaomi.The Mi 3 is in many ways the phone that will define Xiaomi in India, even though it won’t be the one selling the most. That honour could lie with either of the Redmi phones that will follow soon, butMi 3 signals Xiaomi’s intent. Is it a good start?

    [​IMG]
    13MP camera on the metallic back

    Design and build quality

    Boy, is it a good start. The Mi 3 exudes confidence from the moment it’s in your hands. The well-disguised silver back on our review unit could pass off for metal even on second glance, but tap on it and you can tell it’s plastic. That’s no slight, though, as the feel is very much like metal too, which also means there will be times when it feels cold and slippery.

    The front of the phone is all black, with a single cut-out for the earpiece on top. This is in fact quite recessed, which means grime gets in easily. There are three capacitive buttons on the bottom. Xiaomi uses the old Menu button, instead of the current multi-tasking or Recent Apps button, but each capacitive key can be configured to do double-duty through settings (more on the software later).

    [​IMG]
    Speaker grille on the bottom and the rounded sides

    There’s a silver MI on the top left, which is the only branding. It’s also on the back in the lower portion. The back is plain otherwise save for the square camera on top and the dual LED flash, microphone next to it.

    The volume rocker and power button are crammed on the right, which looks less elegant than the traditional arrangement. The buttons themselves are carved out of metal, and have good tactile feedback, and are not hard to find at all, stick out as they do from the body.

    The top and bottom are flat, unlike the rounded edges. The top has the 3.5mm jack, a mini SIM slot (that’s the big one, mind you, so you might need adaptors if moving from a micro or nano SIM), and a noise cancelling mic. The bottom has the speaker grille, which takes up much of the space, but it’s actually just a mono speaker. Next to it is the rather straight-looking microUSB port, which takes in the cable hook-side facing down.

    [​IMG]
    The hardware buttons on the right edge stick out far from the body

    Overall, we were more than pleased with the build quality and ergonomics, though at times a rubberised case would have made us feel more assured about gripping it.

    Display and performance

    The 5-inch full HD display is a joy to view and use. It’s bright, peppy and vibrant without being over-saturated. Viewing angles are very good too, and Xiaomi packs in some basic colour temperature and saturation settings for you to get it just right.

    The Mi 3 did not give us any stutters or freezes in operation. The Snapdragon 800 SoC, the 2GB of RAM deliver what they promise, and everything from camera operation to playing games, and switching between apps was smooth. MIUI is infamous for being a buggy OS, but the Mi 3’s raw performance powers it past these minor impedances.

    [​IMG]
    Very minimalist look

    Multimedia performance was great. 1080p videos look sumptuous on this screen, which has renders dark scene with as much aplomb as colourful frames. The audio experience is equally good, through earphones, headphones and even through the speaker. The stock music app is quite slick and easily lets you see tagged lyrics and change tracks, while letting the album art shine.

    The mono speaker on the bottom was actually quite powerful and delivered enough detail to make us use it regularly. Volume during calls is quite terrific too, despite the recessed earpiece and the grime that it’s prone to collect.

    Software

    While performance is not a hitch, the UI of Xiaomi’s custom skin is another matter altogether. MIUI has been in development for years and having used it during the Android Gingerbread days, I can say that not much has changed, even though this is Android KitKat. The massive amount of themes makes it fun to keep tinkering with the OS’s look.

    [​IMG]
    Folders and iOS-like homescreens, but with Android widgets

    But out of the box, there’s one thing you cannot change; MIUI does not have an app drawer so all new and system apps are laid out on an ever-expanding number of homescreens. Thankfully, MIUI has native widgets support, so you don’t end up with an iOS lookalike. The widget support does give users a lot more freedom to arrange their screen. For example, you could have all your music and video apps with the music player widget; and all your productivity apps with the glorious Keep widget. In any case, if you hate MIUI, this is Android and with Google Play support to boot. So go crazy with launchers.

    [​IMG]
    Themes change the look of folders; MIUI’s signature toggles and the notification drawer

    I have not brushed up on my custom ROM history, but MIUI was possibly the first custom ROMs to bring in a full page of toggles, along side the notification area. At any time 11 toggles are present and there are others you can drag in, but not more or less than eleven, which is possibly all the toggles one would need. The brightness slider lets you set the minimum brightness, and the auto brightness sensor does not dip below that mark, which is great for outdoors.

    [​IMG]
    Plenty of tweaks for almost everything; MI 3 runs KitKat

    Xiaomi packs in a lot of settings for each aspect from display to sound to how the toggles are arranged in the drawer. It lets you adjust sound according to the kind of earphones plugged in, and lets you tweak long-press actions for the capacitive keys.

    It also lets you choose the permissions each app can access. In fact, when it comes to permissions, MIUI does a better job than stock Android, alerting users when apps tries to access contacts or phone info, and letting them select the action, and whether to allow the app access. Speculation is such a feature is coming with Android L, but MIUI has it right at the moment.

    [​IMG]
    Permissions manager, Themes centre and the slick Music app

    Other than the homescreen arrangement and the extensive theming through the UI, including in core apps such as phone, messaging and contacts, the Mi 3 is any other Android phone and it runs all apps that you would on a Nexus 5 or any other comparable smartphone with ease.

    Camera

    The 13-megapixel camera does a decent job outdoors and indoors. The dreary weather of the last few days did not allow us to test it extensively outside, but the few shots we did manage were quite good and something that’s expected from a 13MP sensor. The front camera is quite adequate too, and should work fine for selfies or video calls. Here are some samples.

    [​IMG]
    With HDR off

    [​IMG]
    With HDR on

    [​IMG]
    Great detail in close-ups

    [​IMG]
    Accurately captures colours

    [​IMG]
    Macro with foreground in focus

    [​IMG]
    Macro, with focus on the figurine in the background

    Xiaomi has made big claims about its HDR mode, and it’s surely snappy. While the results are not super impressive, it does not overly saturate the image. Burst mode is a charm to use. You could easily shoot around 50 images in four seconds. The stock camera UI comes with native filters and a skin tone adjustment tool. It also features a panorama mode.

    Battery life

    The Mi 3 is stellar in the battery department, when it comes to battery life and charging speed. We got a full days’ usage without any issue as the Mi 3 conserves power brilliantly when not in use. We never found ourselves fretting about the Mi 3 dying on us on our way back home, because it always had enough to get through the next hour and more. Xiaomi has also built in PC-like power management profiles which lets you select the use case such as high-performance or power-saving mode.

    What’s brilliant is that the phone charges very quickly. In about 30 minutes, we went from 0 to 40 percent, which is a boon if you are constantly pulling down cellular data, on the move.

    [​IMG]
    Stellar battery life

    Verdict and price in India

    It’s been a great month for Indian smartphone buyers of all budgets. You have the superbly-priced andbrilliantly-produced Zenfone series from Asus. Then there’s the LG G3,the best high-end Android in the market currently, and possibly the phone of the year. And then we have the Mi 3.

    It’s brilliant in nearly every aspect. I say ‘nearly’ because there’s one audience that the Mi 3 is not for, and I am part of that pool. During the course of the review my trusty Nexus 4’s display went bust and I have been struggling with the notion of buying a new phone, because seriously there’s just so much choice. Was the Xiaomi Mi 3 for me? It’s almost identical in specs tothe Nexus 5and at half the price. But I turned it down because the custom ROM support for this phone is negligible. Having become used to mods and flashing aftermarket ROMs on a weekly basis, I could never imagine giving that up for the Mi 3.

    Secondly, MIUI is all-pervasive and we don’t know yet how Xiaomi will respond to the massive paradigm shift that is Material Design. MIUI is from a different era of Android, one where Android and design did not meet, but as third-party apps and more of Google’s apps make the shift to Material Design, MIUI is going to feel ancient and far-removed from Google’s vision. Yes, Xiaomi may manage to release an Android L-based MIUI as soon as it’s out, but whether it will be able to retain any of that slick L UI is still a big question.

    But don’t let that nitpicking digression distract you from the verdict; those are not the considerations of an average smartphone user in any case. The Xiaomi Mi 3 is fantastic; it’s near-perfect. For its price, it’s without parallel, and any talk about competition is hollow given how the Xiaomi Mi 3 has performed in our hands. It’s Android at heart and brings with it all the familiar customisation options to change the UI, which is honestly the only demerit. Regardless of whether you can afford to pay three times the asking price, the Xiaomi Mi 3 is the one to go with (when it’s back in stock).


    Xiaomi Mi 3 review: Rebuilding the image of Chinese smartphones - Tech2
    Layman likes this.
  2. Layman
    Offline

    Layman Colonel Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,203
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    US UAE
    Country:
    United States United States
    :clap: Looks Kewl... :tup:
  3. kaku
    Offline

    kaku Guest

    Naa, Chinese.:p1
  4. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Awesome...;)
  5. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Homegrown phone makers just raced past Samsung in India and China
    [​IMG]
    Racing ahead.Reuters/Danish Siddiqui

    Samsung is now where Micromax once used to be: the second largest mobile phone maker in India.

    And six years after entering the business, Micromax—once seen as a homegrown upstart taking on global behemoths like Samsung and Nokia—is now the subcontinent’s biggest phone maker.

    [​IMG]
    The Gurgaon-headquartered firm controlled over 16% of the Indian mobile phone market during the second quarter of 2014, according to report by Counterpoint Technology Market Research, with Samsung a close second at 14.4%.

    It’s been nothing less than a sharp slide for the Korean manufacturer in the last few months, and a significant gain for its main Indian competitor.

    In the first quarter of the year, according to market research firm IDC, Samsung had a 20% share of the market, with Micromax at 12%.

    But much has changed in that one quarter. First, Micromax has begun leveraging some important global partnerships. It launched two Windows phones with Microsoft, which owns Nokia, a major local competitor. And it’s also partnering with Google on building a sub-$100 smartphone for emerging markets.

    In addition, Micromax has worked on getting three key things right, according to Counterpoint research director Neil Shah: investing on building its brand, forming deeper distribution networks into both urban and rural markets, and offering a broad portfolio of handsets with localization (such as regional languages).

    The result has been that Micromax’s share of the market has steadily risen, even as the market itself has changed, with strong growth in smartphone sales.

    [​IMG]
    In the smartphone segment, Samsung still retains the lead, with a 25.3% marketshare, compared with Micromax, which is at second place with 19% marketshare.

    [​IMG]
    Samsung, meanwhile, is hurting even more as Motorola and a clutch of Chinese brands have begun cutting into the mid-tier (under $200) segment.

    Motorola, for instance, has reportedly sold over one million handsets in India solely through e-commerce retailer Flipkart, while China’s Xiaomi similarly sold out the first batch of its phone in India within 38 minutes and 50 seconds on the same platform. The second batch of Xiaomi’s flash sale was sold out in five seconds on Flipkart.

    Counterpoint’s Shah told Quartz that it’s going to be “a blood bath with the Indian and Chinese brands offering more value-for-the-money-type products undercutting Samsung”.

    Samsung India has disputed the figures. “This is not at all correct,” a company spokesperson told the Economic Times.

    Samsung recently posted its worst quarterly numbers in two years, as it struggles globally to fend off Chinese competition at the lower-end of the mobile phone market and Apple at the top.

    “It’s a precarious situation for the Korean vendor,” Shah added. And not just in India. In China, too, the one-time market leader has just been toppled by Xiaomi, the one-time upstart.

    The tables, it seems, are turning.
  6. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Oppo N1 mini launching in India this month

    We’ve been expecting the awkwardly named Oppo N1 mini to hit India sooner than later and now the company has confirmed the same through an official tweet on its Twitter account. We’ve only been told that it’s coming soon, without being treated to any information on the exact release date.

    The Oppo N1 mini should technically be a watered down version of its larger variant judging by its moniker, right? But it’s not really getting a bad deal considering the phablet-sized 5-inch touchscreen spread across its front and the 2GB of RAM you’ll find under the hood.

    [​IMG]

    The mini phone features the same rotating lens as its larger sibling and while some might call it a marketing gimmick, we don’t see why just having one good quality camera is unreasonable on a handset. The snapper boasts of integrating a Sony 6-element lens and a Super Zoom mode to capture photos at 24MP.


    Oppo N1 mini key specs at a glance:

    - Platform: Android with Color OS
    - Camera: 13MP rotating snapper w/ flash
    - Memory: 16GB ROM, 2GB RAM
    - Display: 5-inch 720 x 1280p HD resolution screen
    - Processor: Quad core 1.6GHz Snapdragon 400 chip
    - Power source: 2140mAh Li-ion battery
    - Color options: White, black, pink, blue, yellow
    - Dimensions: 148.4 x 72.2 x 9.2 millimeters
    - Weight: 151 grams

    [​IMG]
  7. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Xiaomi Mi3 to go on sale today with 15,000 units on Flipkart

    [​IMG]
    The flagship Xiaomi Mi3 which was recently launched in India.

    Xiaomi will be putting on sale the third batch of Mi3 smartphones on Flipkart today, and it has officially announced the number of units available on Twitter, in an attempt to make the buying experience a lot smoother than the first two rounds. Registrations for the third round of sales closed last night.

    [​IMG]

    Xiaomi is using Raksha Bandhan as a stage for pitching its next round of smartphones, with the official tweet saying “Make this Raksha Bandhan a special one for your sister”. However, Xiaomi is releasing just 15,000 units, which means there’s a good chance that many would go empty-handed.

    Xiaomi has reportedly sold over 20,000 phones in India since it was launched on July 22. The first day, it reportedly went off shelves within 40 minutes, while the second batch sold in five seconds. Even with the evident demand, Xiaomi has been releasing meagre units, much to the frustration of the masses.

    At just Rs 13,999, it packs a Snapdragon 800, which is by far the cheapest high-end phone available in the market. It competes with the likes of the Nexus 5, Galaxy S4, Xperia Z at nearly half the price.
  8. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    TRAI may put usage fee on WhatsApp, Viber and the likes: report

    [​IMG]

    With the rise of instant messaging apps like WhatsApp, Viber and others, telcos had started to make noise against the rampant adoption of these services. In April, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) disclosed to be working on discussion paper that looks at the impact of Over-The-Top (OTT) players such as messaging apps. Looks like, TRAI is on its way to find a solution by putting a fee on such apps.

    According to a report by Business Today, TRAI held a seminar to initiate the process to bring in a regulation for providers of apps like WhatsApp and Viber to pay connectivity charges to telecom companies and share revenue with the government.

    The key pointers of discussion at the seminar were ‘new developments in OTT, impact of OTT on telecom services providers and their counter measures, legal and regulatory framework for OTT’. It also plans to release a discussion paper. However, the report further points out it may not pose major restrictions on such apps.

    The good old ‘SMS’ and even phone calls have been suffering due to the rise in popularity of these apps. Several telcos including Bharti Airtel, Vodafone India and Idea Cellular, reportedly want app providers to pay a connectivity charge to make up for the losses in revenue, since many apps replace core revenue streams such as SMSes or phone calls.

    The report points out that telcos currently ‘lose around Rs 5,000 crore annually’ because of such free apps . This figure is expected to cross Rs 16,400 crore in the next two years, as the number of users opting for data will increase.
  9. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Apple and Samsung call off patent wars outside the States

    Probably one of the major setbacks of the ones who love to follow the tussle between tech giants, as Apple and Samsung seem surrendered to each other in peace. The reports have it that Samsung and Apple have decided to call it an end to the innumerable patent related lawsuits that have been running all around the globe outside the United States. This can be stated as the first step taken by the Smartphone makers to reduce the hostility that has been growing between them.

    [​IMG]
    According to the reports, the first official statement came from the Korean Smartphone maker. According to the statement released by Samsung, both the companies have decided that they will not pursue the patent related lawsuits outside the United States. On one hand when Samsung seems to be like talking peace, the company has also made a clear statement that they will not back out of the lawsuits pending in the US.
  10. Marc
    Offline

    Marc Colonel Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    Likes Received:
    316
    Country:
    India India
    Asus Zenfone 5 review: Finally, a smartphone to dethrone the Moto G
    #ASUS ZENFONE
    [​IMG]
    PRICE

    ₹13,999


    By Roydon Cerejo / 17 Jul 2014 , 10:08:31
    Asus has re-entered the smartphone market in India with their new Zenfone series announced at this year’s CES. The new series is available in four screen sizes – 4, 4.5, 5 and 6 inches. Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the Zenfone 5. With a starting price of just Rs 10,000 for the 8GB model, can it take the ‘budget-king’ crown away from the Moto G?



    Design and Build

    We’ve already talked about the design and aesthetics at great length in our unboxing and first impressions articles, so we’ll keep it short and sweet this time. The Zenfone 5, as with the rest of the family, has a simple candy bar design. It’s not too flashy and thanks to the changeable covers, it’s not boring either.



    [​IMG]
    Good build and finish


    The phone is built mostly of plastic while retaining a premium look and feel. The Zenfone is also quite sturdy and durable and will easily handle a few knocks and bumps along the way. The placement of ports and buttons are pretty ergonomic and have good tactile feedback.



    [​IMG]



    Overall, the Zenfone 5 is built well and although it might not be the flashiest phone on the block, many will appreciate its simple aesthetics.



    Feature

    The middle child of the family rocks a 5-inch IPS, HD display that’s also got a scratch resistant coating from Corning. The display is quite vivid and colours are fairly punchy. Viewing angles are pretty good as well. Asus also bundles an app which lets you adjust the colour temperature of the display to suite your needs.



    [​IMG]
    The new Zen UI looks very nice


    The phone features Android 4.3 and the refreshed Zen UI, which is a big departure from Asus’s previous skins. The new theme follows a flat look for all the icons, which seems to be the trend these days. There’s a bunch of useful apps thrown in as well from Asus like Share Link and Remote Link. The heavily skinned version of Android doesn’t slow down a bit however, which is highly commendable. The app called ‘What’s Next’ throws up lockscreen notifications on the weather or any upcoming calendar appointments you might have.



    [​IMG]



    The Zenfone 5 is powered by an Intel Atom Z2560 SoC which consists of a dual-core Clover Trial+ CPU running at 1.6GHz. The phone also features 2GB of RAM. Together, the chipset delivers better performance than MediaTek’s MT6582 and Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 400 SoC, which are commonly seen in phones in this price segment.



    Media

    The Zenfone is available in 8GB and 16GB variants and both have expandable memory. The new look of the music player is very slick and easy to use. Audio is pretty loud as well through the loud speaker. The player lets you stream audio through DLNA as well and we have the standard EQ settings of Jelly Bean.



    [​IMG]
    Media playback is good


    Connectivity

    The Zenfone 5 supports dual-SIM functionality, 3G and 2G. We also get Wi-Fi ‘n’, Bluetooth v4.0, GPS and GLONASS. The phone comes with plenty of productivity apps like Tasks, Flashlight and an app called Omlet, which lets you share photos among friends.



    [​IMG]
    Some of the bundled apps


    Camera

    The 8MP camera sensor features an aperture value of f/2.2 and manages to capture good low-light-shots. The camera interface is completely overhauled but is still easy to get around. The quality of pictures is pretty good as well for a budget offering.



    [​IMG]
    The new interface for the camera


    [​IMG]
    HDR mode


    Battery life

    The 2110mAh battery manages to deliver a day-long battery life and you can squeeze out even more with the power saving modes turned on. It came out of our 8-hour battery test with quite some juice to spare. This is a great advantage for the Zenfone 5.



    Verdict and Price in India

    The Asus Zenfone 5 starts at Rs 12,999, although at the launch, Asus said you could find it for as low as Rs 10,000, for the 8GB model. In our books, that seems like unbeatable value when you consider its rich feature-set and good all-round performance. It’s really hard to fault the Zenfone 5 as it doesn’t really stumble much in any department. The Moto G seems to have met its match, finally!
  11. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    All players will have to think big to stop the Xiaomi wave...people won't be opting for a 13,000 Asus phone with lesser features than the Mi3.
  12. Marc
    Offline

    Marc Colonel Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    Likes Received:
    316
    Country:
    India India
  13. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Will have to convince people so or should ban if it's built that way. Just a news report won't help. The configuration is too good and will wipe out Micromax, Karbonn and similar players if they don't get their strategies right!!
  14. Marc
    Offline

    Marc Colonel Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    Likes Received:
    316
    Country:
    India India
    as per me ... everyone spies ... but the way the chinese do it is not acceptable ... spy on everyone and everything.

    Indian companies have to think beyond price ... a low cost phone has a shelf life of not more than 6months to 1 year ... people are ready pay if they find quality... i have a nokia which my father bought in year 2000 ... still work like a charm

    only way to convince people is to sell quality product ... for that u should have RnD n manufacturing inside the country.
  15. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    That's true, but Xiaomi only assembles stuff, just like Micromax & Karbonn...media is crying about all this spying stuff, but then why the govt is not taking any action? WeChat was also accused of same, its still available in India. If govt has doubts then action must be taken. Just because Micromax or Karbonn can't compete with Xiaomi, they can't ask for a ban. I believe this whole spy issue is their idea.

    We also have telecom companies wanting to ban Whatsapp and similar apps because they're losing sms revenue. I won't be surprised if they also come up with such stories.
  16. Marc
    Offline

    Marc Colonel Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    Likes Received:
    316
    Country:
    India India
    inadequate law ... lack of infrastructure to control or stop such hardware/software.

    telecom companies are just bitching ... due to revenue.. there is nothing more to it ... they do not talk about the revenue generated by selling 2g 3g net pack at high price ... they themselves loot people during festive season ... if u send msg on 31 dec or diwali it will definitely cost u 5 Rs. or more.
  17. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Trai Drops Plans To Charge Fee On WhatsApp, Skype & Viber

    Finally the common sense has prevailed. Reports suggested that Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (Trai) has rejected the proposal by cellular service providers to impose revenue sharing rules on popular service apps like Whatsapp, Skype etc.

    It looked like the pressure by the cellular operators had got the better of Trai when it decided to hold a consultation on the matter. This provoked widespread criticism and Trai decided to stamp its authority and end the matter without pursuing it.

    What the cellular operators want?

    They claimed that due to the apps offering free messaging and calling services, there was a decline in the use of cellular and SMS services.

    This, they said had led to the loss in revenue and claimed in turn the apps were making money at their behest.

    So they wanted a control over what the users did with their internet connections and restrict the usage of the apps by creating a distinction between the types of data sent and received.

    Basically this meant the operators wanted the apps to pay them money if they wanted to allow their users to access them.

    Why it was opposed?

    The argument of cellular operators losing revenue due to these apps was absurd because they were already earning money through data usage.

    This was seen as a money grabbing ploy by the operators rather than the ‘level playing’ filed that they claimed.

    Once the operator provides internet connectivity and charges for it is up to the user how he uses it and the service providers cannot claim control over it.

    According to a report in Economic Times, “"One-third of the incremental revenue of the telecom industry is coming from data services itself. As far as the voice services are concerned, there is an upswing in the realisation rates," said a Trai official.

    "There is no proposal for a consultation paper (on regulating companies offering free messaging and calling services)," he added.

    On a whole it is a victory for the network neutrality and if Trai had accepted the demands it would have set a dangerous precedent where one would claim compensation from a third party to make up their losses.
    Marc likes this.
  18. IndianDefence
    Offline

    IndianDefence Administrator Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    6
    Country:
    India India
    That is good. Mobile broadband is the future they need to understand that.
  19. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Will new TRAI guidelines on long distance calls benefit customers?

    TRAI (Telecom Regulatory Authority of India) on Tuesday issued regulations prescribing access charges payable by International Long Distance Operator (ILDO) to the Telecom Service Provider (TSP).

    The regulator said access charges to be paid by ILDO to Access Provider will be 40 paisa per minute for wireless services and Rs 1.20 per minute for wireline services.

    TRAI said it would be reasonable to fix the access charges at 40 paisa per minute for wireless and at 120 paisa per minute for wireline after giving a mark-up of about 15 percent on the access costs derived above.

    The prescribed access charges would be the default option in all cases where negotiations between TSP and ILDO are not successful. While the TSP and ILDO would be free to enter into mutually agreed access charges, the access charges prescribed in this Regulation would be applicable where no agreements are entered into, now or in the future.

    However, all the agreements need to be entered into within the time frame prescribed in the various provisions of this regulation, said TRAI.

    ILD freedom is a failed topic in the Indian telecom history.

    Earlier, TRAI gave sufficient time to TSPs to negotiate access charges among themselves to provide choice of ILDOs to consumers so that consumers can get competitive rates for making their ISD calls. However, a number of TSPs were not able to arrive at a mutually negotiated access charge. Therefore, TRAI after following due consultation process has prescribed the access charges through this regulation.

    Interestingly, the new regulation coming into place after 14 years since the first direction was issued to TSPs to provide facility to consumers to choose their NLDO/ILDO. TRAI has stepped in with the new guidelines as consumers did not have the choice of selecting their long distance operator for making STD/ISD calls and get the advantage of competition in the long distance sector.

    Tata Communications, Bharti Airtel, Reliance Communications, BSNL, etc. are some of the leading long distance operators in India.

    TRAI earlier noted that at each stage in the process, TSPs have tried to dodge the introduction of competition.

    In the current prevailing regime, a consumer does not have the option to choose its ILD Operator for making ISD calls.

    The consumer depends on its access provider for making ISD calls. To provide the facility to subscribers to choose their NLDO/ILDO for their STD/ISD calls, TRAI issued a direction on 24 July 2002. The direction could not be implemented due to various reasons given by TSPs. When this issue was again revisited in 2008 by TRAI, TSPs suggested that a primary objective of providing choice of a long distance operator could be achieved by allowing Long Distance Operators to issue calling cards.

    The licenses were amended in 2010 to allow NLDO/ILDO to issue calling cards directly to consumers. Intelligent Network Regulation was also amended to facilitate time bound agreements between TSPs. However consumers still do not have the choice of Long Distance Operator for making STD/ISD calls.

    TRAI says access charges to be paid by the calling card service providers to the access service providers for calling card services should be based broadly on the principle of work done by the access service provider. This requires estimation of the associated costs so that the access provider is not burdened with under-recovery of costs while at the same time ensuring that the end-user does not bear costs unrelated to access.
  20. Rock n Rolla
    Offline

    Rock n Rolla No Nonsense Staff Member Administrator

    Messages:
    1,316
    Likes Received:
    142
    Location:
    Trivandrum
    Country:
    India India
    Apple iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 plus: All you need to know
    [​IMG]

    Finally, Apple’s iPhone 6 is here. Keeping up with most of the rumours, this newest iteration of the iPhone comes in two screen sizes – 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch. The 4.7-inch model is called iPhone 6 while the jumbo-screen phablet is christened iPhone 6 Plus. Apple has crafted the biggest and thinnest iPhones ever. Here’s everything you need to know about the iPhone 6 models.



    In the bid to keep up with the growing demand for larger displays, Apple has finally dropped its 4-inch display and moved onto larger display sizes. However, this doesn’t mean the device has got any bulkier. In fact, the company, known for shedding off weight with each generation leap has continued its tradition. The iPhone 6 as well as iPhone 6 Plus are the slimmest iPhones ever at 6.9mm and 7.1mm respectively. It should be noted that the iPhone 5S was 7.6mm slim. Moreover, the rounded edges and glass front curves, gives it an iPad-like look.

    [​IMG]
    Rounded edges

    The larger displays have also ensured more pixel resolution of 750 x 1334 for the iPhone 6 and 1080 x 1920 for iPhone 6 Plus. They are also believed to be the most powerful iPhones ever. The iPhone 6 and 6 Plus come with the all-new A8 processor. Apple claims that it comes with 2 billion transistors, making it 25 percent faster for any ordinary computing task and 50 percent faster for graphics.

    This boost in power won’t take a toll on the battery life either, claims the company. In fact, the devices claim to offer slightly better battery life. While iPhone 5s offered 10 hours of battery life over Wi-Fi, the iPhone 6 increases it by an hour to 11 hours and iPhone 6 Plus to 12 hours. The battery life will also ensure prolonged talking on the phone compared to 10 hours offered by their predecessor - 14 hours on the iPhone 6 and 24 hours with the iPhone 6 Plus.

    On the camera front (8MP), these devices come with a plethora of improvements. Firstly, they are fitted with a new sensor for faster auto-focus to avoid blurry shots. You will also find a new slow-motion video feature. Basically, you can take videos at 240 frames per second and then slow them down to view at a fraction of their original speed. One of the interesting features is Burst selfies. This means take several quick selfies and select the best among them. In addition, the iPhone 6 Plus also comes with optical image stabilization that detects and offsets shaky moments.

    [​IMG]
    (Image: AP)

    Both models come with some networking improvements compared to its predecessor. These devices now support 20 different frequency bands, allowing them to operate in more countries. The technique called carrier aggregation allows the devices to utilize multiple frequency bands at the same time that can offer speeds 50 percent faster than the iPhone 5S, claims Apple. Besides cellular network, Apple has also improved Wi-Fi capabilities with the support for 802.11ac.

    The iPhone 6 and its bigger sibling run the latest iOS 8 operating system unveiled at WWDC earlier this year. Some of the highlights of the iOS 8 includeintegration of Mac and iPhone allowing easy switching between one device to another, Swype-like QuickType onscreen keyboard, support for third-party keyboards, iCloud Drive service that lets users save a file and automatically synchronize it across devices, to name a few.

    The iPhone 6 also comes with support for Apple’s new Pay mobile payments service. The NFC chip helps with contact-less payments at supported terminals. The purchases are authenticated via the device’s TouchID sensor. The company has teamed up with American Express, MasterCard, and Visa, as well as the six largest banks in the US. About 22,000 retailers will work with its Pay service and will be available in the US next month.

    As expected, the iPhone 6 costs $199 for the base model with 16GB of storage, $299 for a 64GB model and $399 for a 128GB model (with contract). The larger size iPhone 6 costs $100 extra – $299 for a 16 GB model, $399 for 64GB and $499 for the 128 GB model. The previous models get a price cut, the iPhone 5S sells for $99 and iPhone 5C free with contract. Users can opt for space grey, silver or gold options. The pre-orders for the new iPhone begin onSeptember 12and Apple fans can visit the retail store on September 19.

Share This Page